Annual Carter County Summer Bird Count tallies 116 species

 

Members of the Lee and Lois Herndon Chapter of Tennessee Ornithological Society, known less formally as the Elizabethton Bird Club, conducted the 21st annual Carter County Summer Bird Count on Saturday, June 7.

Photo by Bryan Stevens  A total of 231 Song Sparrows, such as the one pictured here, were found during the recent Summer Bird Count.

Photo by Bryan Stevens
A total of 231 Song Sparrows, such as the one pictured here, were found during the recent Summer Bird Count.

The 19 observers in six parties logged 58 party hours, plus 5.5 nocturnal party hours. The total of 116 species tallied was slightly above the average of 112. The range for this count has varied between 105 and 121 species.

 Observers included Jim Anderson, Rob Armistead, Kevin Brooks, J.G. and Deb Campbell, Harry Lee Farthing, Don Holt, Christy Kendall, Rick Knight, Roy Knispel, Joe McGuiness, Tom McNeil, Cathy Myers, Kathy Noblet, Chris Soto, Bryan Stevens, Kim Stroud, Mary Anna Wheat and John Whinery.

The species list follows:

Canada Goose, 379; Wood Duck, 11; Mallard, 74; Ruffed Grouse,  6; Wild Turkey,  9; Double-crested Cormorant, 1; Great Blue Heron, 25; and Yellow-crowned Night-Heron, 3.

Black Vulture, 4; Turkey Vulture,  60; Sharp-shinned Hawk,  2; Cooper’s Hawk,  1; Broad-winged Hawk, 4; Red-tailed Hawk, 4; and American Kestrel,  6.

Killdeer,  6; American Woodcock, 1; Rock Pigeon, 67; Mourning Dove, 111; and Yellow-billed Cuckoo, 1.

Eastern Screech-Owl, 3; Barred Owl, 3; Common Nighthawk, 1; Chuck-will’s-widow, 2; and Eastern Whip-poor-will, 13.

Chimney Swift,  96; Ruby-throated Hummingbird,  30; Belted Kingfisher,  7; Red-bellied Woodpecker, 15; Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, 1; Downy Woodpecker,  21; Hairy Woodpecker, 6; Northern Flicker, 22; and Pileated Woodpecker, 11.

Photo by Bryan Stevens The Ruby-throated Hummingbird was represented by a total of 30 individuals on the recent Summer Bird Count.

Photo by Bryan Stevens
The Ruby-throated Hummingbird was represented by a total of 30 individuals on the recent Summer Bird Count.

Eastern Wood-Pewee, 26; Acadian Flycatcher, 44; Alder Flycatcher, 4; Least Flycatcher, 9; Eastern Phoebe, 38; Great Crested Flycatcher, 4; and Eastern Kingbird, 17.

White-eyed Vireo, 10; Yellow-throated Vireo, 2; Blue-headed Vireo, 54; Red-eyed Vireo, 166; Blue Jay, 91; American Crow, 130; and Common Raven, 6.

Purple Martin, 21; Tree Swallow, 152; Northern Rough-winged Swallow, 36; Cliff Swallow, 295; and Barn Swallow, 159.

Carolina Chickadee, 71; Tufted Titmouse, 72; Red-breasted Nuthatch, 9; White-breasted Nuthatch, 15; Brown Creeper, 1; Carolina Wren, 86; House Wren, 54; and Winter Wren, 8.

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, 41; Golden-crowned Kinglet, 10; Eastern Bluebird, 48; Veery, 31; Hermit Thrush, 2; Wood Thrush,  56; American Robin,  356; Gray Catbird,  44; N. Mockingbird,  59; Brown Thrasher, 16; European Starling,  607; and Cedar Waxwing,  94.

Ovenbird, 70; Worm-eating Warbler, 14; Louisiana Waterthrush, 4; Golden-winged Warbler, 3; Black-and-white Warbler,  38; Swainson’s Warbler, 3; Kentucky Warbler, 1; Common Yellowthroat,  27; Hooded Warbler, 88; American Redstart, 9; Northern Parula,  15; Magnolia Warbler, 2; Blackburnian Warbler,  14; Yellow Warbler, 5; Chestnut-sided Warbler, 27; Black-throated Blue Warbler,  35; Pine Warbler, 4; Yellow-rumped Warbler, 1; Yellow-throated Warbler, 13; Black-throated Green Warbler, 34; Canada Warbler, 24; and Yellow-breasted Chat, 10.

Eastern Towhee, 120; Chipping Sparrow, 100; Field Sparrow,  37; Vesper Sparrow,  1; Song Sparrow, 231; Dark-eyed Junco, 89; Scarlet Tanager, 27; Northern Cardinal,  157; Rose-breasted Grosbeak, 17; Blue Grosbeak, 2; and Indigo Bunting, 181.

Red-winged Blackbird, 69; Eastern Meadowlark, 25; Common Grackle,  95; Brown-headed Cowbird, 39; Orchard Oriole, 7; Baltimore Oriole, 4; House Finch,  28; Red Crossbill, 1; American Goldfinch, 166; and House Sparrow, 128.

Photo by Bryan Stevens Although waterfowl can be difficult to find in Carter County during the summer months, a total of 11 Wood Ducks were tallied for the Summer Bird Count.

Photo by Bryan Stevens
Although waterfowl can be difficult to find in Carter County during the summer months, a total of 11 Wood Ducks were tallied for the Summer Bird Count.

All 116 species found on the count are known or suspected to nest in Carter County, except for the Double-crested Cormorant.

•••••

Hampton resident Barbara Lake emailed me to share some photos of a clutch of eggs in one of her bluebird boxes.

Photo Courtesy of Barbara Lake A clutch of five Eastern Bluebird eggs in a box at the home of Barbara and Jerry Lake in Hampton.

Photo Courtesy of Barbara Lake
A clutch of five Eastern Bluebird eggs in a box at the home of Barbara and Jerry Lake in Hampton.

She actually has two pairs of Eastern Bluebirds nesting in boxes at her home. She has named the bird Blossom and Max, as well as Aliy and Allen. The latter are named for Iditarod and Yukon Quest musher friends.

“I wrote to Aliy and told her I named a bluebird after her, and she is happy about it.  So now I have to keep her up to date about what’s going on.”

Some of Barbara’s bluebird boxes are equipped with television cameras, which allows her to monitor activity on a television screen in the comfort of her home.

•••••

Now that it is July, birding sometimes becomes more difficult because of the intense heat, high humidity and other factors. There are still interesting bird observations to make. Many birds are still taking care of young, either in or out of the nest. If you’d like to share an observation, make a comment or ask a question, email me at ahoodedwarbler@aol.com or post a comment here.

 

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